Here’s an 55-min recorded video Dhamma Talk (196MB .mp4).

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Sutta References:

  • SN 12.12 - Moḷiyaphagguna

    “Venerable sir, who consumes the nutriment consciousness?”

    “Not a valid question,” the Blessed One replied. “I do not say, ‘One consumes.’ If I should say, ‘One consumes,’ in that case this would be a valid question: ‘Venerable sir, who consumes?’ But I do not speak thus. Since I do not speak thus, if one should ask me, ‘Venerable sir, for what is the nutriment consciousness [a condition]?’ this would be a valid question. To this the valid answer is: ‘The nutriment consciousness is a condition for the production of future renewed existence. When that which has come into being exists, the six sense bases [come to be]; with the six sense bases as condition, contact.’”

    “Venerable sir, who makes contact?”

    “Not a valid question,” the Blessed One replied. “I do not say, ‘One makes contact.’ If I should say, ‘One makes contact,’ in that case this would be a valid question: ‘Venerable sir, who makes contact?’ But I do not speak thus. Since I do not speak thus, if one should ask me, ‘Venerable sir, with what as condition does contact [come to be]?’ this would be a valid question. To this the valid answer is: ‘With the six sense bases as condition, contact [comes to be]; with contact as condition, feeling.’”

    “Venerable sir, who feels?”

    “Not a valid question,” the Blessed One replied. “I do not say, ‘One feels.’ If I should say, ‘One feels,’ in that case this would be a valid question: ‘Venerable sir, who feels?’ But I do not speak thus. Since I do not speak thus, if one should ask me, ‘Venerable sir, with what as condition does feeling [come to be]?’ this would be a valid question. To this the valid answer is: ‘With contact as condition, feeling [comes to be]; with feeling as condition, craving.’”

    “Venerable sir, who craves?”

    “Not a valid question,” the Blessed One replied. “I do not say, ‘One craves.’ If I should say, ‘One craves,’ in that case this would be a valid question: ‘Venerable sir, who craves?’ But I do not speak thus. Since I do not speak thus, if one should ask me, ‘Venerable sir, with what as condition does craving [come to be]?’ this would be a valid question. To this the valid answer is: ‘With feeling as condition, craving [comes to be]; with craving as condition, clinging; with clinging as condition, existence…. Such is the origin of this whole mass of suffering.’

    “But, Phagguna, with the remainderless fading away and cessation of the six bases for contact comes cessation of contact; with the cessation of contact, cessation of feeling; with the cessation of feeling, cessation of craving; with the cessation of craving, cessation of clinging; with the cessation of clinging, cessation of existence; with the cessation of existence, cessation of birth; with the cessation of birth, aging-and-death, sorrow, lamentation, pain, displeasure, and despair cease. Such is the cessation of this whole mass of suffering.”

  • SN 12.17 - The Naked Ascetic Kassapa

    “How is it, Master Gotama: is suffering created by oneself?”

    “Not so, Kassapa,” the Blessed One said.

    “Then, Master Gotama, is suffering created by another?”

    “Not so, Kassapa,” the Blessed One said.

    “How is it then, Master Gotama: is suffering created both by oneself and by another?”

    “Not so, Kassapa,” the Blessed One said.

    “Then, Master Gotama, has suffering arisen fortuitously, being created neither by oneself nor by another?”

    “Not so, Kassapa,” the Blessed One said.

    “How is it then, Master Gotama: is there no suffering?”

    “It is not that there is no suffering, Kassapa; there is suffering.”

    “Then is it that Master Gotama does not know and see suffering?”

    “It is not that I do not know and see suffering, Kassapa. I know suffering, I see suffering.”

    “Whether you are asked: ‘How is it, Master Gotama: is suffering created by oneself?’ or ‘Is it created by another?’ or ‘Is it created by both?’ or ‘Is it created by neither?’ in each case you say: ‘Not so, Kassapa.’ When you are asked: ‘How is it then, Master Gotama: is there no suffering?’ you say: ‘It is not that there is no suffering, Kassapa; there is suffering.’ When asked: ‘Then is it that Master Gotama does not know and see suffering?’ you say: ‘It is not that I do not know and see suffering, Kassapa. I know suffering, I see suffering.’ Venerable sir, let the Blessed One explain suffering to me. Let the Blessed One teach me about suffering.”

    “Kassapa, [if one thinks,] ‘The one who acts is the same as the one who experiences [the result],’ [then one asserts] with reference to one existing from the beginning: ‘Suffering is created by oneself.’ When one asserts thus, this amounts to eternalism. But, Kassapa, [if one thinks,] ‘The one who acts is one, the one who experiences [the result] is another,’ [then one asserts] with reference to one stricken by feeling: ‘Suffering is created by another.’ When one asserts thus, this amounts to annihilationism. Without veering towards either of these extremes, the Tathāgata teaches the Dhamma by the middle: ‘With ignorance as condition, volitional formations [come to be]; with volitional formations as condition, consciousness…. Such is the origin of this whole mass of suffering. But with the remainderless fading away and cessation of ignorance comes cessation of volitional formations; with the cessation of volitional formations, cessation of consciousness…. Such is the cessation of this whole mass of suffering.’”

  • SN 12.25 - Bhūmija

    “Ānanda, when there is the body, because of bodily volition, pleasure and pain arise internally; when there is speech, because of verbal volition, pleasure and pain arise internally; when there is the mind, because of mental volition, pleasure and pain arise internally—and with ignorance as condition.

    “Either on one’s own initiative, Ᾱnanda, one generates that bodily volitional formation, conditioned by which pleasure and pain arise internally; or prompted by others one generates that bodily volitional formation, conditioned by which pleasure and pain arise internally. Either deliberately, Ānanda, one generates that bodily volitional formation, conditioned by which pleasure and pain arise internally; or undeliberately one generates that bodily volitional formation, conditioned by which pleasure and pain arise internally.

    “Either on one’s own initiative, Ānanda, one generates that verbal volitional formation, conditioned by which pleasure and pain arise internally; or prompted by others one generates that verbal volitional formation, conditioned by which pleasure and pain arise internally. Either deliberately, Ānanda, one generates that verbal volitional formation, conditioned by which pleasure and pain arise internally; or undeliberately one generates that verbal volitional formation, conditioned by which pleasure and pain arise internally.

    “Either on one’s own initiative, Ānanda, one generates that mental volitional formation, conditioned by which pleasure and pain arise internally; or prompted by others one generates that mental volitional formation, conditioned by which pleasure and pain arise internally. Either deliberately, Ānanda, one generates that mental volitional formation, conditioned by which pleasure and pain arise internally; or undeliberately one generates that mental volitional formation, conditioned by which pleasure and pain arise internally.

    “Ignorance is comprised within these states. But with the remainderless fading away and cessation of ignorance that body does not exist, conditioned by which that pleasure and pain arise internally; that speech does not exist, conditioned by which that pleasure and pain arise internally; that mind does not exist, conditioned by which that pleasure and pain arise internally. That field does not exist, that site does not exist, that base does not exist, that foundation does not exist conditioned by which that pleasure and pain arise internally.”

Other References:

  • My favorite Dhamma Talk on Metta: “Lovingkindness Metta”, by Ajahn Brahm. (Note: link expires Mar 15th, 2021)
  • ~3300 Dhamma Talks (for you to recursively download, link expires March 15, 2021)

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